Meal Planning for Breakfast

I’ve been doing some thinking on how far I’ve come from when I first figured out I had IBS and discovered the FODMAP diet.  Besides the constant threat of diarrhea and the pain associated with it, what I remember clearly is the panic I felt around the question ‘what can I eat today?’. I didn’t start out consciously meal planning for breakfast, but I do have a small list of go-to menu items that make it easy for me to start my day AND to grocery shop for.

I can readily admit that I’m not a health nut.  I try to eat balanced, nutritious meals, but I don’t calorie count.  Maybe I’ll get there, but for now, I’m mostly just concerned about the basics about feeding myself.  I love eating for pleasure (having candles on the table makes food taste better, somehow), and can’t see myself gulping down a kale smoothie just ‘because it’s good for me’.  Maybe someday, but not today.

If anyone reads this and is starting out on their FODMAP journey, I hope you can get some inspiration from this post.  I shop at two stores: Safeway and Planet Organic.  Hopefully the ideas will make life just a teeny bit easier for you…. I’ll include recipes in later posts…

Granola Breakfast

toast

 

 

 

 

Breakfast – Weekdays

I tend to alternate between two menus during the week.  Easier to buy groceries for, easy to prepare on mornings when I need to eat before I’m fully woken up.

  • allergen free (gluten, egg, dairy, FODMAP free) bread, toasted, spread with organic crunchy peanut butter and topped with slices of bananas.
  • a dollop of goats-milk yogurt (for some reason my body can handle milk from goats but not a cow), granola (either a low-FODMAP kind from the store or home-made), and fresh berries sprinkled on top (I alternate between raspberries and blueberries, and have discovered that I can tolerate a small amount of blackberries (high on Polyols on the Monash FODMAP app).

scones baked

Breakfast – Weekends

If I’m lazy, I stick to the above.  But I do enjoy baking, and preparing foods with my family so will have one of the following for a special breakfast on a weekend.

Pancakes

  • Oat scones topped with marmalade.
  • Allergen free pancakes, with fruit salad (made with whatever I have on hand that’s got a green light from the Monash FODMAP app), and bacon. Served with pure maple syrup.

Breakfast – on the road

  • Travelling can be a real challenge for someone with IBS.  If I’m staying in a hotel, I make sure I have my rice cakes and organic peanut butter with me.  I’ve found that as long as I’m at a table of people who are ordering off the menu, my bringing food doesn’t cause much of a stir (I do try to be a little discreet, though). If I get an odd look, I’ll order a side of bacon off the menu and that seems to make everything OK.  On the bonus side, crispy bacon on a peanut butter slathered rice cake is incredibly yummy.

And those are about it.  I’ve experimented with other options, but these seem to be my go-to menu items.  At first, deciding what to eat can be daunting, but I’ve discovered that meal planning for breakfast doesn’t have to be a mind-bending, expensive or earth shifting experience.  Good luck to your own breakfast plans!

Review of the Living Without magazine

I have been wanting to do a review of the Living Without magazine for a while now, as it is an important part of my life with IBS.  Living Without is published bi-monthly by Belvoir Media Group LLC and is a fantastic resource for people who are living with food allergies and intolerances.

 

My copies of the Living Without magazine
My copies of the Living Without magazine

At the beginning of this year, I was pretty much at the end of my rope – I had diarrhea and cramps all the time, my bloating was painful, I was exhausted and very discouraged with the help I was getting (or not getting ) from my physician and naturopath.  I discovered the Living Without magazine on the shelf of a shop that I didn’t normally go into, and was intrigued by its tag line: “The magazine for people with allergies and food sensitivities.”.

Inside this issue was an article written by Rory Jones titled: FODMAP: Road Map for IBS.  Rory included a small ‘cheat sheet’ listing of foods to avoid and foods to enjoy.  I had nothing to lose at this point so decided to give it a try.  It was my hallelujah moment – within a week my symptoms eased off and I felt hugely better.

This article literally changed my life.  I now really look forward to the Living Without magazine arriving at my door.

Every issue contains a variety of articles on a wide range of IBS related issues.  Asthma, infertility, and backpacking have been just a few of the topics covered this year.  I particularly enjoy reading the Research Round Up Department and always get a laugh out of We’ve Got Issues (irreverent solutions to your real life allergy drama), written by April Peveteaux.

April Peveteaux's hilarious "We've got Issues" in the Living Without magazine
April Peveteaux’s hilarious “We’ve got Issues” in the Living Without magazine

Living Without is one of the few magazines that I actually am interested in the advertising!  The new products that are being made available to folks with Celiac, IBS, Food intolerances and allergies are a ray of sunshine, and I’m appreciative of this place to see what’s new to the market.

And the recipes!! In the April/May issue Lisa Stander Horel authored a fabulous article on baking Big, Fat, Soft Cookies that was so exciting to me.  I plan on using her Vanilla Soft Cookies as a base for my Christmas baking experiments this year.  With a dairy, egg and FODMAP intolerance, my baking options are slim – but Lisa’s ideas have given me something to work with.

Lisa Stander Horel's inspiring cookie recipes in the Living Without magazine
Lisa Stander Horel’s inspiring cookie recipes in the Living Without magazine

If I have one concern about the magazine is that the latest issue doesn’t have the tag ‘the magazine for people with allergies and food sensitivities ‘ on it, but has replaced it with ‘gluten-free living at it’s best’.  I hope it’s not going to focus on just the gluten free aspect of food issues, as I find there are a large collection of publications dedicated to this area already.  The rest of us, with wider ranging issues, really can benefit from a magazine that includes us too….

If you can’t find Living Without on the news stands, check out their website Living Without .  Hopefully you will find this resource as fantastically helpful as I have!

Eating out with IBS

I’ve got a dinner invitation that I’m not sure I can refuse… it’s a family thing, and everyone thinks they are being kind to me – so I don’t have to cook.  It’s hard to tell family that eating out with IBS and food intolerances is a LOT of work.

However, I am determined to rejoin the greater world, despite having IBS, AND, I’m feeling much more confident after our road trip experience this summer.  So I’m going to do my best to make this dinner out work for me.

My first step is to go online and check out the websites of a few restaurants.  I went with larger chain restaurants, because they seem to be much more aware of food allergies, and will sometimes be so organized they provide nutrition and ingredient listings online.  I checked out three:  Joey’s, Moxie’s, and Earl’s.

I discovered that Earl’s didn’t seem to have a printable allergy/nutrition listing online (that I could find).  Moxie’s has a guide available and it very clearly lists out many of the common allergen ingredients in their food (including the common FODMAP foods).  Almost everything on the menu has either dairy, gluten, onions and garlic, though.  Joey’s didn’t have any of this information on line, but they did have the option of emailing the restaurant with a special request.

I have decided to go with Moxie’s because their on-line information is the most comprehensive (although, you do have to do some digging).  Their website shows the phone number of each restaurant, so my second step is to call them.  I managed to get the manager and he was terrific to chat with.  He assured me that they take food allergies special requests very seriously, and I found this to be comforting.

Moxie's on line allergen information is well laid-out.
Moxie’s on line allergen information is well laid-out.

We’ve booked the restaurant, and now I just need to make sure I eat gently in the days leading up to the outing.  I want my stomach to be calm, and I want my nerves to be collected when we walk into that restaurant!  I think I’ve messed myself up in the past by letting my anxiety get to me, so I’ll work to trust in my plan. (step 3!).

My fourth and final step for preparation will be to print off my chef’s card to bring along with me. I’ll make sure to speak up confidently (but cheerfully!) to our waiter and ask for their help.

I plan on giving this to my server each time we go out to a restaurant!
I plan on giving this to my server each time we go out to a restaurant!

I’ll prepare The Husband by letting him know that he might be on tasting duty if I have any suspicions about what gets served to me.  I will also repeat my usual 30-minute wait request:  I like to sit about 30 minutes after a meal (that I haven’t prepared myself) to see if I have an immediate reaction.  My reaction to dairy is this fast, and I don’t want to be I the car when a case of diarrhea hits.

As for the egg and other FODMAP unfriendly ingredients, I’ll just have to wit to the following day to see if I had success in eating out with IBS at this particular restaurant.  Wish me luck!

 

My 3 Meds

My 3 Meds

Well, I’ve made yet another adjustment to my diet!!  It seems that just following a FODMAP diet isn’t enough for me to have regular bowel functions.  A bit of logic and investigation has led me to discover my new best friends – My 3 Meds.

My 3 Meds

In my posts earlier this month, I wrote that my symptoms seemed to be getting worse.  A lot of loose stools, a lot of gurgly tummys after meals.  I hate living like that so I went looking for yet another ‘tweak’ to my diet.

I sat down and took a look through the IBS Self Help and Support Group Forum (www.ibsgroup.org/forum/).  This is an awesome on-line resource for people suffering from IBS and related diseases – It’s a great place to see what others are trying and what new research is coming out.  Because there are so many causes for intestinal trouble, there are just as many possible solutions to try!  If you haven’t checked out the site yet, take some time to go through it.  If anything, it helps to not feel so alone.

Under one of the discussion forums I discovered something called Linda’s Calcium Info.  This intrigued me even though I am highly sceptical of anyone telling me to take stuff.  However, there were lots of people who seemed to be helped by it, and I already had calcium pills in medicine cabinet so I thought I’d give it a try… here is her suggestion:

With each meal, take a half calcium tablet.  Avoid calcium tablets with magnesium and avoid eating lettuce.

That’s it.  Weird, huh?

I figured that I already needed to take calcium (because dairy is on my ‘no eat’ list), and I had the calcium tablets without magnesium on hand, so…. what the heck – let’s give it a try.

Can you believe it – it worked!  I noticed right away that my stomach was less burbly, and within a couple of days I almost stopped having bowel movements.  This scared me a little, so I only started taking the half-calcium tablet with dinner.  I don’t know what the magic is, but I’m going with it.

Now, just a word of warning – according to the forum, this doesn’t work for everyone.  Some people find that it causes a gas problem.  As I said, everyone is different.  All I know, is that it worked for me.

I didn’t want to pin all my hopes on a miracle cure because of all the summer road trips we have planned – I’m just not keen about being on the road with diarrhea.  So I also began two other ‘treatments’:

  1. I figured that my stool might be soft because my diet is pretty light on fiber.  So I picked up a container of Metamucil and stared taking a spoonful with a glass of water each morning.
  2. My physician, naturopath, and dietitian all recommended that I take a probiotic every day, so I found a good quality one (that doesn’t contain FOS or other non-friendly FODMAP ingredient).

With the combination of the half-calcium tablet, the fiber, and the probiotic I almost feel normal lately.  Regular bowel movements that are of good colour and form, no burbly tummy and no bloating.

It does seem to be important that I take all three, and I will be experimenting to see if it’s critical that I take all three every day.  I’ll also experiment with the lettuce ban.  I have enough banned foods to deal with, I don’t want to add more.

I feel funny calling them  My 3 Meds, as no prescription was needed.  But I feel safe In taking them, and I’m feeling much more confident about the road trips coming up.  Stay tuned to hear how things go…

 

FOODS THAT MAKE MY GUT ANGRY

 

I was thinking that I would share with you what foods I’m currently avoiding because they give my digestive system a hassle.  I’m technically on the challenge phase of the FODMAP diet, but I’m finding life so enjoyable without IBS symptoms that I’ve been reluctant to risk getting sick again – it’s easier (for me) to avoid everything and feel good!

 

Food Intolerances:

 

DAIRY:  My system cannot tolerate any amount of bovine dairy, in any form.  It’s more than just a fermentable issue with me – the smallest amount of even the ‘safe’ dairy (american cheese, parmesan, yogurt) will send me running to the washroom with watery diarrhea within a half hour (usually sooner).  I’m lucky that I can tolerate goats milk and related products (different protein makeup), so this has taken the sting out of loosing this food group.

 

EGGS:  My IgE blood panel tells me that it’s just the egg whites that my system reacts to.  However, this reaction is so strong (intense headache, fatigue, bowel discomfort) that I have written off all egg products. 

 

BEEF:  Eating a steak will result in me staying awake all night as I suffer through every groan, cramp, twinge and strain of my gut trying to break this meat down.  I can have a bite of steak (my husband is pretty good about sharing), but I haven’t chanced much more than that.

 

STRAWBERRIES:  Eating a few of these has me running to the bathroom with diarrhea and cramping within a few hours.

 

And FODMAPS.  FODMAP stands for Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols – the carbohydrates that are malabsorbed in my intestine.  I get very confused as to what an Oligo vs Fructan vs Fructose are, so bear with me…

OLIGOSACCHARIDES:  My excellent FODMAP App from Monash University tells me that fructans and galactos are in this group (FOS and GOS for short).  Vegetables like garlic, legumes and onions are listed.  Fruit like nectarines, peaches, apples and watermelon are included.  Grains like barley, rye, wheat are included.  Nuts like cashews and pistachios are included too.  This carbohydrate is also disguised as inulin on ingredient listings. 

I definitely have trouble with garlic and onion.  Apples are out for me.  I haven’t really challenged the rest.  The Monash FODMAP app helpfully lists some foods that have moderate Oligos-fructan/FOS and or GOS  – I’ve been avoiding these so maybe it’s time to try and start my food challenge with these items.  I know a serving of broccoli (listed on the app as having ‘moderate Oligos -fructan/FOS and or GOS’), at dinner doesn’t upset me too much.

DISACCHARIDES: lactose (dairy).  I stay away from all dairy, not sure if it’s an intensive reaction to the carbohydrate or the protein (casein).  Dairy causes my most immediate, intense reaction.

MONOSACCHARIDES:  one molecule sugars.  Glucose, fructose and galactose (lactose) are here. Honey, high fructose corn syrup, and fruits like apples and mangos are included.  I know honey and apples mess me up, so I’ve been avoiding these too.

POLYOLS: Polyols are sugar alcohols.  Sorbitol and mannitol (found in some fruits and vegetables and often found as artificial sweeteners) are some of these.  Cauliflower, mushrooms, snowpeas, peaches, watermelon are listed as having high mannitol levels, and I have been avoiding them. I know that giving up gum was one of the things that helped alleviate my symptoms so the artificial sweeteners are obviously a problem for me.

So, in a nutshell, most food makes my tummy grouchy.  This leaves me with limited options as far as cooking goes – most helpful ‘low FODMAP’ recipes are out for me (or need a lot of adjusting) because they will include eggs or dairy of some kind.

Watch for my next posting, where I list the Top 10 ingredients that I keep in my pantry. 

My Journey, Part 3

Remember how I said that removing the foods on the food panel blood test made me feel better?  Well, that lasted.  For about 3 months. 

And then the symptoms came back again.  Slowly at first, and during the month of December. You know – the time of year where there is food everywhere.  Beautiful food.  Special food.  So delicious food.   

So at first, I didn’t know if I was truly getting worse, or just ‘accidentally’ eating foods on my forbidden list.   

But, my cramping and bloating and dashes to the bathroom were becoming more frequent.  By the time Christmas actually arrived, I was scared to eat anything.  We were spending Christmas at my Mom and Dad’s place – and my mom is a great cook.  No, scratch that – she’s an amazing cook.  She was so worried about making me sick, but I simply had too many forbidden foods for her to remember.   

And, on top of that, we were flying to go visit them.   

Now, I should mention that the symptoms weren’t really, really bad here.  I just felt tired, with weird bowel movements, lots of bloating and cramping.  Weird enough for me not to trust being on a plane without a good dose of pepto bismol to keep any surprise diarrhea under control.   

In January, I tried to talk rationally to myself.  I hate always feeling yukky.  I’m a ‘suck it up, buttercup’ kind of gal.  I’m not THAT sick, right?  So I started a ‘feeling’ diary – where I just wrote down the date, and a short comment on how the day went.  ‘Good’ if I had a good day, HLHS if I had a headache on my left hand side, BMx4, runny (4 bowel movements, runny), that sort of thing.  At the end of the month I looked back:  There was only one day where the entry said ‘Good’.   

I can’t live like this.  What to do? 

I tried my Doctor again: I just got the sad look and an offer to book me in for allergy testing.  I was pretty sure I didn’t have allergies, but put myself on the waiting list. 

I  contacted my naturopath and reviewed my food and symptom diaries.  I confirmed that I was  taking the expensive probiotics.  Yes, I was also taking the right fiber supplements.  Yes, I was (now) avoiding the forbidden foods.  I could tell the naturopath was stumped.  

It turns out that my girlfriend has a naturopath who suggests smelly powders and potions.  Have you ever heard of Slippery Elm and Marshmallow Root?  My friend swears by this combination.  I mentioned this to the naturopath and she said it couldn’t hurt (but she did look doubtful that it would help).  I purchased some at my local supplement store and tried them – I think they are just a ‘natural’ alternative to pepto bismol.  They helped a bit with the diarrhea, but they aren’t as effective as pepto bismol.   

The couple at my local health supplement store recommended a special fiber supplement.  I was desperate enough to buy it.  It ain’t cheap, and  this stuff not only tastes, really, really bad, but it stinks to high heaven.  Do I really need to do all this just to feel ‘normal’? 

And that’s when I got my February/March issue of Living Without.  Inside was an article about researchers at the Monash University in Australia who were studying IBS and investigating something called FODMAPs.  I was encouraged to see that their work was the result of actual research!  Included in the article was a small box, listing common foods to avoid and foods to enjoy.  I ripped it out and stuck it to the refrigerator. 

What the hell, I thought.  Let’s give it a try.  At this point I was desperate – I had a heating pad on my belly every evening trying to calm the pain.  And every morning was spent with repeated trips to the bathroom.  The new diet was worth a try. 

The results were almost immediate.  The bloating went away.  The cramps went away.  And, thanks to the researchers at Monash University, the diarrhea went away too.   

I’ve been following a FODMAP diet for a little while now, but it seems longer – I think because my days are so full – of doing things in the real world!  I’m not continually stuck in the bathroom, or sacked out on the couch with a headache, or walking around painfully with a belly that looks like I’m 8 months pregnant. 

Yes, there have been bumps along the way.  I know that my other attempts at a ‘cure’ only lasted for a little while – so I am a bit nervous that this good thing won’t last.  But I sure will enjoy it while it does! 

My Journey, Part 2

To manage my IBS symptoms, I had about 6 or 7 months living (begrudgingly) happily without milk,  but then the symptoms returned.  Terrible headaches (deep in my eye-sockets) and unpredictable diarrhea.   Bloating, cramping, exhaustion.   

A trip to my Doctor was of not much help.  After I described my symptoms and my test results were reviewed, (remember, the tests show that I am ‘healthy’), the Doctor looked at me sadly and said “unfortunately, we are seeing a lot of this sort of thing.  It’s very common”.   

And that was it!!  Not much of a plan of action, is it? 

I was pretty desperate for some help, and now not really enthused about the medical community (I know: one doctor a whole community does not make). Needless to say I was pretty frantic.  I knew that I couldn’t keep on living with the cramping and the hours of sitting on the toilet, never mind the accidents which were embarrassing and kept me trapped more and more often at home. 

 A good friend of mine had had some success with similar issues after she had seen her naturopath.  I was very reluctant to take this path, as I really didn’t know what naturopaths did. 

I envisioned an ancient and wizened practitioner who tried to sell me a variety of ill-smelling and expensive powders and potions. 

I was very wrong.  My naturopath has had extensive medical training, is young and has really never tried to sell me any ‘potions’.  We both believe that we should get our nutrition from food and not additives. 

What she did do, though, is spend an entire hour going over my history, symptoms, a diary of food that I had been eating along with tracking symptoms, and my medical test results.  It felt so good to be finally heard and taken seriously!   

On her recommendation, I took a basic food panel blood test.  It shows the antibodies (IgE and IgG4) that your body creates when it is struggling to accept various foods.  The way I understand it,  higher antibody levels indicate that your body is REALLY not happy with what it’s dealing with. 

I was floored by the test results.  Dairy, Beef, Green Beans, Kidney Beans and Eggs all scored in the ‘not safe’ zone. 

This took me a while to process.  Firstly, I had thought I had already eliminated dairy from my diet – in which case my body shouldn’t still be fighting it.  My naturopath suggested that I need to be more vigilant in reading ingredient labels.  She was right – I had been missing hidden dairy in a lot of products.   

Beef, I had started to suspect that something was a problem here.  After eating a lovely barbequed steak one evening, I spent the wee hours of the morning curled up in agony on the couch – I could almost feel my gut having difficulty processing the meat. 

Green Beans?  What is up with THAT?  Green beans are  supposed to be GOOD for you. 

Kidney beans?  Never was a fan.  Easy to give these up. 

Eggs?  Well, now.  I may have been willing to eliminate dairy from my diet, but eliminating eggs would be another thing altogether.  I like to bake.  I love fried egg sandwiches.  My go-to fat free dessert is angel food cake.  No, not eggs too. 

As if to prove a point I made an angel food cake that evening.  Enjoyed it tremendously.  And spent the next day in bed.  Yes, yes eggs too. 

My Naturopath also suggested that I take a high quality pro-biotic as well as a fiber supplement, and to diligently track what I eat.   

I was happy I had a plan of action.  And I got results almost immediately –  once I removed the offending foods from my diet I quickly felt better physically (no diarrhea, no headaches).   

Mentally was a different story.  The feeling of loss was pretty strong.  I wanted to talk to someone about this, but I doubted there was a ‘mourning the loss of your favorite foods’ support group out there. 

So I ploughed on, looking for help with books I picked up from the library and searching for information on the internet.  I was pleased and amazed to know that I wasn’t alone.  I still don’t understand how there can be such a large group of unwell people out there, and the medical community or marketplace seems to ignore us entirely.   

Armed with my new sources of information, I was determined to get back to enjoying life again. I was done with being ill! 

Ha!

 

My Journey, Part 1

So where did my IBS adventure start?   

 I started developing symptoms about 2 years ago (it seems much, much longer than that).  At first I thought I had a stomach flu that just wouldn’t go away!!  I was truly miserable.  I soiled my pants.  Running to the bathroom became an awful sporting event.  As you probably know from your own experiences, feelings of anger, sadness and desperation all take turns in your head. 

Then it tweaked on me that dairy might be the problem.  I made this discovery while I was on vacation –  I don’t eat very well on vacation: wine instead of milk, a snack of fries instead of yogurt, you get the gist… 

Once I discovered what was giving me trouble, I had to decide what to do next.  I had many, many worries.  What if there is something really wrong with me?  How can yogurt possibly be bad for me?  How can I live the rest of my life without dairy?  Is that even possible? 

My biggest fear was wondering what could be causing this.  Peoples stomachs just don’t suddenly start disliking certain foods, do they? 

I met with my Doctor, and she assured me that yes, stomachs sometimes suddenly do just that.  She thought it would be a good idea for me to have a couple of tests to make sure there wasn’t something structurally wrong with me, and so a stool sample as well as a colonoscopy with biopsies were arranged.   

Let me be the first to tell you, these are very, very fun tests to take.  If you have any sense of pride and modesty, just take a deep breath and learn to love your wild side. 

 On the bright side, everything came back clean.  I was healthy!!  (insert maniacal laughter here). 

So, all that was left for me to do, was to remove dairy completely from my diet.  This was a pretty big change for me,  and besides being irrationally irritated at the thought of life without cheese I also had a worry about long-term consequences.  My mother has osteoporosis, so cutting dairy out of my diet probably wouldn’t be good for me, right?  

I was feeling pretty low at this point.  It seemed that my life was turning into a life of denial.  Not that I was a big glutton before, but it’s always unpleasant to have options taken away from you.  

My next stop was to a Registered Dietitian.  This was a really positive experience, partly because of a lucky coincidence – she was also lactose intolerant.  She was able to give me lots of pointers:  how to ensure I’m getting enough calcium, how dairy can be disguised on a food label  (who knew there were so many code words for ‘milk’?), and even what sorts of dairy alternatives exist in the grocery store.   

 She wanted me to test for my tolerance for dairy – and I discovered in a rather unpleasant way that just a spoonful of yogurt has nasty consequences for me. 

My Dietitian did suggest trying goats milk cheese –  the protein in goats milk is structurally slightly different than in cows milk.  By now I was terrified of anything dairy, and was reluctant to just give it a try.  I quizzed the folks at my local cheese boutique as well as the cheese stall at my local farmers market.  Once convinced that the two dairy products are in fact quite different I summoned up the courage to try chevre (the word for cheese made from goats milk).  I was thrilled to learn that goats milk is an option for me! 

So, from my Physician I learned I was healthy (ha ha) and from my Registered Dietitian, I learned how to ensure I would get my daily calcium needs met… as well as finding out that my life could go on. 

Once I got dairy out of my diet, I was thrilled to discover side benefits – no more running to the toilet, and (bonus round) no more of those weird  headaches I had been getting for years.

 Yay!

 It was a “cure” (I understood that it wasn’t really a cure) like many others – a cure with a price.  I was pretty angry that I had to give up dairy, and all the foods it hid in.  Chocolate bars will be forever off limits to me.   Here’s my embarrassing confession:  every time I’d see that commercial with happy women saying that my bowel problems would go away if I just ate more yogurt I would go and buy some.  Talk about the power of marketing!!  I’d be too scared to eat it, and always end up throwing it away.  What a terrible waste…

 Yup, a cure with a price.    But I’d take it.