FODMAP-Free Rhubarb Crumble

Summer  is here and it’s time to enjoy fresh food from the garden or farmers market!  I have a rhubarb plant tucked into the corner of my yard and it’s the first thing I can harvest each year.  One of the things we look forward to is a warm Rhubarb Crumble, spooned over ice cream (or frozen coconut, rice or soy milk for those of us with dairy intolerances!).  A FODMAP-Free Rhubarb Crumble is a wonderful spring and summer treat…

FODMAP-Free Rhubarb Crumble
FODMAP-Free Rhubarb Crumble

I adapted this recipe from the one printed on the back of the GoGo Quinoa package.  Apples are a no-go, so it took just a little tweaking to make this into a FODMAP-Free Rhubarb Crumble recipe.

 FODMAP-Free Rhubarb Crumble

  • 8×8 pan
  • Chopped rhubarb, enough to fill at least 1/2 the depth of the pan
  • 6 Tbsp sugar
  • 2 tsp. cinnamon
  • 2 tsp. Earth Balance dairy free baking margarine

Grease the pan, add the chopped rhubarb.  Mix the sugar and cinnamon together and sprinkle over the rhubarb.  Add small dots of margarine to the top.

For the crumble:

  • 4 tsp Earth Balance dairy free margarine
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup gluten free flour
  • 1/2 cup quinoa flakes

Melt the margarine and toss with the sugar, flour and flakes.  Spoon this over the rhubarb in the pan.  Cover with foil and bake at 350 degrees for 15 minutes.  Uncover and bake until crust is golden and rhubarb is tender (approximately 25 minutes).

This is a terrific way to use rhubarb.  Rhubarb is given the green light on the Monash FODMAP app, so it’s nice to have this option for fresh fruit!

Chopped Rhubarb

 

Chicken Chili and Pasta

I have to admit that this winter is wearing on me.  It takes a great deal of effort to talk myself out of wearing my oversized flannel shirt every day!  I’m so lazy that I might as well be hibernating – and that’s why this recipe for Chicken Chili and Pasta is perfect.  It’s very, very easy and is one of my go-to recipes for when my tummy isn’t feeling well.  Very FODMAP friendly!

It’s also quick and uses so few ingredients that I almost always have them on hand.  It’s a good recipe for beginner cooks to learn.

Chicken Chili and Pasta
Chicken Chili and Pasta

Chicken Chili and Pasta

  • 1 Package of ground chicken (you could substitute ground turkey as well)
  • 1 can of Aylmer Accent Fire Roasted diced tomatoes (they have no onion or garlic included)
  • 1 Tsp Cumin (I add more because I like it)
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • Cooked Rice Pasta (I use the Tinkyada brand)

That’s it!  That’s all the ingredients!

Chicken Chili Pasta ingredients
Chicken Chili Pasta ingredients

First brown the ground chicken in a frying pan (I sometimes use a bit of olive oil).  Once browned, stir in the cumin, salt and pepper and tomatoes.  Simmer for about 5 minutes and serve over cooked pasta!

This recipe serves 3 hungry people and I often will double the recipe to make extras for leftovers to keep in the fridge.  Because the Aylmer diced tomatoes are so chunky, I will sometimes add half the can as is, and then blend the rest with my hand blender in the can before adding it.

Here’s hoping for an early spring!

FODMAP Free Baking for Christmas

It’s that time of the year again… Christmas!!! Over the years I’ve gone through Christmas with a varying degree of enthusiasm.  There was the Christmas that I celebrated by making Martha Stewart look lazy.  There was the Christmas that wasn’t so much celebrated as… endured.  This year I fall right in the middle of the two extremes and I have to admit part of my hesitation is the challenge of FODMAP-free baking for Christmas.  Can it be done?  Yes!

Dairy free, egg free, gluten free and FODMAP free.  And YUMMY!
Dairy free, egg free, gluten free and FODMAP free. And YUMMY!

The lights were up on our house at the beginning of December, the tree was up the following weekend.  We sent out about 60 Christmas cards (complete with cheezy family photo), and have attended various parties.  The one big thing that was missing from my Christmas preparations was the marathon Christmas baking that I used to do.

Now that I am dairy, egg and FODMAP intolerant, my tried and true Christmas baking recipes just make me a tad blue.  I did attempt last year t0 modify shortbread using rice flour and goats butter, but the cookies were a crumbly mess.  I vowed then not to attempt to bake Christmas cookies again.

But, another year later, I feel like something is missing from the Christmas festivities if I don’t do some baking.  There’s’ nothing worse than having food around that I can’t eat, so I asked The Husband and The Son what kind of Christmas cookies were their favourite and I would bake only that.  The Husband chose shortbread so I bought butter for the first time in years and made him up a batch of that (careful not to lick fingers!!).  The Son surprised me and chose gingersnaps.

“But those aren’t Christmas Cookies”  I said.

“That’s what I want” he said.  So that’s what I made for him.

Of course, all this baking made me crave some treats that I could have too, so I did some experimenting.  I used the basic white cookie recipe that I got out of the Living Without magazine, and attempted something… Christmassy.

I experimented and came up with three different cookies and I’m quite proud of them.  Not only do they look great on the cookie tray, they are so tasty that someone who didn’t know they were dairy free, egg free and FODMAP free (including gluten free), would be surprised.

Here’s my recipe for the Citrus Pops.  They are soft and sweet, with a crunchy citrusy zing.  Very pretty on the plate too!

Lemon and Orange candied peel make these zingy and pretty!
Lemon and Orange candied peel make these zingy and pretty!

FODMAP Free Baking – Citrus Pops

Cookies:

  • 1 box gluten free vanilla cake mix
  • 1/2 c Earth Balance baking margarine
  • 1 heaping tablespoon of egg replacer (of choice) and 3 Tbsp of water
  • 1/3 cup almond milk
  • 1/2 tsp. lemon extract

Icing:

  • 2 cups Icing Sugar (more if needed for consistency)
  • Sugar water (see candied peel recipe)

Topping

  • Candied orange and lemon peel

Instructions:

Mix cookie dough, it should be very soft.  Use damp hands to roll into balls (dough will be sticky), and bake on parchment at 350 degrees for 12 minutes.  Remove from parchment and cool.

Cooling and waiting to be iced!
Cooling and waiting to be iced!

Add 1-2 Tbsp sugar water to the icing sugar and beat.  Add more icing sugar or sugar water depending on consistency.  You want a thick, but not too dry icing.  Dip tops of cookies into the icing (use spatula to smooth over the top of the cookie) and then dip immediately into candied peel (I kept the orange and lemon candied peel separate so I had two different types of cookies).

Let icing firm up and store.

Candied Orange Peel

  • 4 oranges
  • 4 cups water
  • 2.5 cups sugar
  • 1 cup sugar (for dredging)

Wash oranges thoroughly.  Peel oranges, trying to keep pieces as large as possible (makes the next step easier).  With a sharp knife, slice off as much of the white part (pith) as possible (it’s bitter).  Dice the peel finely.

Dicing Orange Peel

Combine water and first amount of sugar into medium pot over medium heat.  Bring to boil and simmer for about 5 minutes.  Add peel and simmer for about 2 hours (check frequently to make sure pot doesn’t run over or dry out).  I’ve seen advice not to stir, but I run a spoon around the sides once or twice.  Remove from heat and let sit to cool.  Drain in colander (keep this sugar water to make the icing).

Dredge the peel in sugar (about 1 cup), and place on parchment covered pan in a 200 degree turned-off oven to dry out.  Check to make sure the oven isn’t too hot – you don’t want to bake these!  Let the peel dry out (you can leave them for an hour or overnight).  Store in a dry location.

This works with lemon peel as well, but I found the colour didn’t stay as vibrant after boiling.  To spruce up the colour, I put the 1 cup of sugar (for dredging) in a clean empty jar, added 1-2 drops of yellow food colouring and shook until the sugar was the desired colour.  I then dredged the boiled peel in this before drying out in the oven.

The Citrus Pops have been a big hit around here, and also generates some interest when I take them to gatherings.  Many people have food intolerances, and they welcome something safe to indulge in!

Have a very Merry Christmas!

 

Review of the Living Without magazine

I have been wanting to do a review of the Living Without magazine for a while now, as it is an important part of my life with IBS.  Living Without is published bi-monthly by Belvoir Media Group LLC and is a fantastic resource for people who are living with food allergies and intolerances.

 

My copies of the Living Without magazine
My copies of the Living Without magazine

At the beginning of this year, I was pretty much at the end of my rope – I had diarrhea and cramps all the time, my bloating was painful, I was exhausted and very discouraged with the help I was getting (or not getting ) from my physician and naturopath.  I discovered the Living Without magazine on the shelf of a shop that I didn’t normally go into, and was intrigued by its tag line: “The magazine for people with allergies and food sensitivities.”.

Inside this issue was an article written by Rory Jones titled: FODMAP: Road Map for IBS.  Rory included a small ‘cheat sheet’ listing of foods to avoid and foods to enjoy.  I had nothing to lose at this point so decided to give it a try.  It was my hallelujah moment – within a week my symptoms eased off and I felt hugely better.

This article literally changed my life.  I now really look forward to the Living Without magazine arriving at my door.

Every issue contains a variety of articles on a wide range of IBS related issues.  Asthma, infertility, and backpacking have been just a few of the topics covered this year.  I particularly enjoy reading the Research Round Up Department and always get a laugh out of We’ve Got Issues (irreverent solutions to your real life allergy drama), written by April Peveteaux.

April Peveteaux's hilarious "We've got Issues" in the Living Without magazine
April Peveteaux’s hilarious “We’ve got Issues” in the Living Without magazine

Living Without is one of the few magazines that I actually am interested in the advertising!  The new products that are being made available to folks with Celiac, IBS, Food intolerances and allergies are a ray of sunshine, and I’m appreciative of this place to see what’s new to the market.

And the recipes!! In the April/May issue Lisa Stander Horel authored a fabulous article on baking Big, Fat, Soft Cookies that was so exciting to me.  I plan on using her Vanilla Soft Cookies as a base for my Christmas baking experiments this year.  With a dairy, egg and FODMAP intolerance, my baking options are slim – but Lisa’s ideas have given me something to work with.

Lisa Stander Horel's inspiring cookie recipes in the Living Without magazine
Lisa Stander Horel’s inspiring cookie recipes in the Living Without magazine

If I have one concern about the magazine is that the latest issue doesn’t have the tag ‘the magazine for people with allergies and food sensitivities ‘ on it, but has replaced it with ‘gluten-free living at it’s best’.  I hope it’s not going to focus on just the gluten free aspect of food issues, as I find there are a large collection of publications dedicated to this area already.  The rest of us, with wider ranging issues, really can benefit from a magazine that includes us too….

If you can’t find Living Without on the news stands, check out their website Living Without .  Hopefully you will find this resource as fantastically helpful as I have!

Gutsy Broad’s FODMAP Free Salsa

I’m swamped by tomatoes!!  I had to pick my garden’s bounty of tomatoes because of the impending frost, and when I peeked in to check on them a week or so later, I discovered they had all ripened at the same time.  I needed a plan to do something about it!

I’ve already frozen some tomatoes (washed, frozen whole), made up some pasta sauce, and have tinkered around with my usual salsa recipe to use up the last of the tomatoes…  I love salsa, and am so glad that tortilla chips are allowed on the FODMAP diet.

Home-grown tomatoes make this an extra-special treat!
Home-grown tomatoes make this an extra-special treat!

Of course, the big problem with purchased salsa is that it contains a lot of garlic and onions, both of which are high on the FODMAP list.  I left out the garlic (I could use garlic flavoured oil, but I didn’t want to add oil to this recipe(, and just used the green tops of onions.  to get that satisfying crunch, I made sure I added lots of diced red and green pepper.  If someone didn’t know this was a ‘special’ recipe, they wouldn’t be able to figure I out form the taste!

Gutsy Broad’s FODMAP Free Salsa

This is makes just a small amount, and easy to double or triple if you need to make more.  The dicing and draining take a little while, but it’s a fairly fast and easy recipe.  If you like your salsa crunchier, add more red or green pepper.  The amount of cilantro can be easily adjusted to taste as well.

  • 4-5 tomatoes (finely diced)
  • 1/2 red pepper (finely diced)
  • 1/2 green pepper (finely diced)
  • 2-3 stalks green onion (diced)
  • handful cilantro (diced)
  • Salt and pepper
  • lime juice
Fresh and delicious!
Fresh and delicious!

Combine all ingredients and let sit for a half hour or so.  There will be lots of liquid at the bottom of the mixture, use a sieve to drain off.  (I retain the drained juices and will use them in another recipe).

I find this salsa tastes better the next day, after the flavours have blended a bit.  This salsa keeps well in the refrigerator, so is a great make-ahead dish for a party or the big game.

Served with tortilla chips, this is a terrific and nutritious snack that even The Husband and The Son enjoy!  The Son currently doesn’t like spicy foods, but it would be easy to add pepper or pepper flakes to up the zing factor.

Gutsy Broad's FODMAP free Salsa!
Gutsy Broad’s FODMAP free Salsa!

GUTSY BROAD’S SIMPLE SUMMER LUNCH SALAD

 

I started following the FODMAP diet in the winter and as the weather changes I’m finding that I have to scramble to find something suitable for warm days.  This has become one of my fast, go-to lunches –  I usually have the ingredients on hand and it’s simple to prepare.  

 

This FODMAP friendly recipe serves 1, but can easily be doubled (or more!).  I’m planning on packing it for a lunch at work this week, will probably throw a frozen juice box to sit beside the salad so I don’t have to worry about the tuna going bad. 

 

Gutsy Broad’s Simple Summer Lunch Salad

 

  •       ½ can chunked or flaked tuna, drained (I usually save the other half for another salad later in the week)
  •       1 medium tomato diced (picked up from a farmers market or your garden will improve the taste immensely)
  •       Bowl of shredded lettuce, any kind or blend (that is FODMAP friendly).  (I like to chop mine into little bits – I hate trying to awkwardly fit an entire leaf in my mouth.) 
  •       Salt and pepper
  •       Olive oil – the best quality you can afford.  I have a small bottle of expensive olive oil that only I can use, and just for this salad.

 

I basically combine the ingredients, drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle salt and pepper on to taste.  Don’t drizzle or sprinkle too lightly – think of how much salad dressing you’d normally toss a salad with.

 Tuna Salad

 I don’t like eating cold salad, and have even warmed the tuna slightly in the microwave first.  There’s no carbs in this recipe, but I usually have enough with breakfast or dinner, so missing out at lunch is no big deal. 

Pasta with Fire Roasted Tomato Sauce

Ok, this is my first experience blogging with a recipe – let’s see if I can get the ingredients right!  This is a go-to recipe for me when I want something flavourful, but easy on the tummy.  If my gut is giving me trouble, this is the first dinner I make to calm IBS symptoms down.  Originally a Weight Watchers recipe, I’ve heavily adjusted it so that it is FODMAP friendly. 

      • 1 package ground turkey
      • 2 – 3 Tbsp olive oil
      • Salt and Pepper
      • 1 can fire roasted tomatoes (check the can ingredients listing  to make sure that’s the only ingredient as onion and garlic is commonly added)
      • 1 Tsp cumin
      • Rice pasta – I cook the entire 340g package of Tinkyada rice pasta and refrigerate leftovers. 

Here’s a photo of the ingredients, all laid out.  Don’t worry if your can of fire roasted tomatoes is bigger, or if you  have slightly more ground turkey than specified.  It’s one of those recipes where you can’t really mess up.

 Chicken Pasta ingredients

Instructions:

  • Start the water for pasta.  Cook pasta while preparing sauce.
  • Brown turkey in olive oil – make sure the meat is starting to get crispy brown as this adds flavour.  Season with Salt and Pepper.
  • Add fire roasted tomatoes.  The husband isn’t a fan of chunky bits of tomatoes, so I add half the can as is, and then use my wand blender on the remainder in the can to make it more ‘saucey’.
  • Add Cumin, stir and sauté.  When pasta is done, serve.

 Chicken Pasta done

And that’s it!  Simple, yummy and FODMAP friendly – what more can you ask for?  Oh yeah! – The leftovers are great too – I’ll often double the recipe to make sure there are leftovers in the fridge for weekday lunches.